Witch

   A practitioner of witchcraft. Also able to become invisible and fly on a broom. A witch usually doesn't cry, and if she does, she sheds no more than three tears. She also must count things. If she sees a broom, she must count the straws, she must also count seeds on the ground or in a container or the letters in a document. When fighting a witch, giving them things to count can help delay them when you are trying to fight them or slow them down. Just like people, there are good witches and bad ones. The good ones practice White Magic, while the bad ones practice Black Magic. In many countries, it is believed that a person whose eyebrows meet is a werewolf, vampire or witch. See Ergot, Evil Eye, Henbane, Hemlock, Familiar, Magus, Fire, Grain, Quirin, Sabbat, Coven, Roodmas, Halloween, Salt, Water, Warlock, Wicca and Witchcraft.

The writer's dictionary of science fiction, fantasy, horror and mythology. 2014.

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  • Witch — Witch, n. [OE. wicche, AS. wicce, fem., wicca, masc.; perhaps the same word as AS. w[=i]tiga, w[=i]tga, a soothsayer (cf. {Wiseacre}); cf. Fries. wikke, a witch, LG. wikken to predict, Icel. vitki a wizard, vitka to bewitch.] [1913 Webster] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • witch — O.E. wicce female magician, sorceress, in later use especially a woman supposed to have dealings with the devil or evil spirits and to be able by their cooperation to perform supernatural acts, fem. of O.E. wicca sorcerer, wizard, man who… …   Etymology dictionary

  • witch — witch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {witched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {witching}.] [AS. wiccian.] To bewitch; to fascinate; to enchant. [1913 Webster] [I ll] witch sweet ladies with my words and looks. Shak. [1913 Webster] Whether within us or without The spell… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • witch|y — «WIHCH ee», adjective, witch|i|er, witch|i|est. = witchlike. (Cf. ↑witchlike) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Witch — Witch, n. [Cf. {Wick} of a lamp.] A cone of paper which is placed in a vessel of lard or other fat, and used as a taper. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • witch — [wıtʃ] n ↑broomstick [: Old English; Origin: wicca wizard and wicce witch ] 1.) a woman who is supposed to have magic powers, especially to do bad things →↑wizard 2.) informal an insulting word for a woman who is old or unpleasant …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • witch — [wich] n. [ME wicche < OE wicce, fem. of wicca, sorcerer, akin to MDu wicken, to use magic < IE base * weik , to separate (hence set aside for religious worship) > Goth weihs, holy, OE wig, idol] 1. a person, esp. a woman, having… …   English World dictionary

  • witch — [ wıtʃ ] noun count * 1. ) a woman in stories who has magic powers. A man with magic powers is usually called a wizard. a ) a real woman who claims she has magic powers 2. ) an insulting word for an unpleasant woman …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Witch — A name formerly applied to loom dobbies …   Dictionary of the English textile terms

  • witch — [n] person who casts spells over others conjurer, enchanter, magician, necromancer, occultist, sorcerer; concepts 361,412,415 …   New thesaurus

  • witch — ► NOUN 1) a woman thought to have evil magic powers. 2) a follower or practitioner of modern witchcraft. 3) informal an ugly or unpleasant old woman. ► VERB archaic 1) practise witchcraft. 2) cast an evil spell on …   English terms dictionary

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